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Thread: Can old leather rifle slings be 'rejuvenated'?

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    Senior Member tank_monkey's Avatar

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    Can old leather rifle slings be 'rejuvenated'?

    I found a couple of old M1907 slings but the leather is dry. Not cracked, so I was thinking of trying to rejuvenate the leather with some leather treatment oils. I also have some old Karabiner 98K slings that I wanted to salvage.

    Anyone have any luck bringing back old leather slings to life?
    Last edited by tank_monkey; 04-12-2017 at 04:42 PM. Reason: fixed typo on 1917 vs 1907

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    Senior Member Helen Keller's Avatar

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    i use ballistol for all the old leather slings




    what do you mean "salvage" ????
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    Team Guns Network Silver 04/2015 mrkalashnikov's Avatar

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    I've had luck with leather cream made for boots & leather coats. Work the stuff in with your hands then remove the excess with a clean cloth. Don't use neatsfoot or other stuff like it.
    Nietzsche: From life's school of war: what does not kill me makes me stronger.

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    Someone I know used wd40 to bring back the leather parts of some old dried out sks slings.
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    Team GunsNet Platinum 12/2012 l921428x's Avatar

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    Any thing that deals with horse tack
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    Senior Member tank_monkey's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrkalashnikov View Post
    I've had luck with leather cream made for boots & leather coats. Work the stuff in with your hands then remove the excess with a clean cloth. Don't use neatsfoot or other stuff like it.
    Tell me. Why not neatsfoot? I was told to use Neatsfoot by someone just today.

    Thanks in advance.

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    Team GunsNet Platinum 12/2012 l921428x's Avatar

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    Kind of gross in my mind but it should work. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neatsfoot_oil
    I am like water. I follow the path of least resistance
    but you cannot compress me.

    The most precious thing a man can give to another is time,
    as of it, we have so little.

    Pain, as told to me, "Lets you know you are alive."

    "In a time of universal deceit-telling the truth is a
    revolutionary act" George Orwell

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    Team Guns Network Silver 04/2015 mrkalashnikov's Avatar

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    Neatsfoot will actually break down old, damaged leather. The stuff has been around for hundreds of years granted, but there are much better modern alternatives on the market today. Many shoe-repair shops carry the leather cream I mentioned.
    Nietzsche: From life's school of war: what does not kill me makes me stronger.

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    Senior Member tank_monkey's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrkalashnikov View Post
    Neatsfoot will actually break down old, damaged leather. The stuff has been around for hundreds of years granted, but there are much better modern alternatives on the market today. Many shoe-repair shops carry the leather cream I mentioned.
    Thanks for the tip. I went to the local shoe repair shop (just 1/8th of a mile from my front door) and the guy had this.


    I hope this is what you were thinking of.

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    Team Guns Network Silver 04/2015 mrkalashnikov's Avatar

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    Did you tell the guy what you were going to use it for, or better yet bring along one of your slings? Just curious.
    Nietzsche: From life's school of war: what does not kill me makes me stronger.

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    Senior Member tank_monkey's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrkalashnikov View Post
    Did you tell the guy what you were going to use it for, or better yet bring along one of your slings? Just curious.
    I just mentioned that I had old leather straps that were dry and needed treatment. You were right about the neatsfoot oil. A quick google search shows that it breaks down leather quickly.

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    Forum Administrator Schuetzenman's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by tank_monkey View Post
    Tell me. Why not neatsfoot? I was told to use Neatsfoot by someone just today.

    Thanks in advance.
    That's what I would of recommended.

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    Senior Member jet3534's Avatar

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    When I was a kid (which was a long time ago) I remember using mink oil on my baseball glove with good results, i.e. to make the leather softer and more supple. I can also remember using it in the past to waterproof expensive hiking boots. I also would use saddle soap on leather products. Now I use Ballistol for leather, wood, gun cleaning, and all sorts of stuff mainly because I alway have some on hand.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mink_oil

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    Senior Member tank_monkey's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by jet3534 View Post
    When I was a kid (which was a long time ago) I remember using mink oil on my baseball glove with good results, i.e. to make the leather softer and more supple. I can also remember using it in the past to waterproof expensive hiking boots. I also would use saddle soap on leather products. Now I use Ballistol for leather, wood, gun cleaning, and all sorts of stuff mainly because I alway have some on hand.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mink_oil
    I learned something new today. Ballistol sounds great. I'm going to have to check it out

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    Administrator Krupski's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by tank_monkey View Post
    I found a couple of old M1907 slings but the leather is dry. Not cracked, so I was thinking of trying to rejuvenate the leather with some leather treatment oils. I also have some old Karabiner 98K slings that I wanted to salvage.

    Anyone have any luck bringing back old leather slings to life?

    Try this stuff: http://www.preservation-solutions.co...r-conditioner/

    Worked great on the leather of my old Sorel boots. Doesn't cost much either.


    (edit to add): Why the F--K does the link first redirect to an ad site called "VigLink"? Have we been hacked?

    I clicked this link to opt-out of it: http://www.viglink.com/opt-out/
    Last edited by Krupski; 04-13-2017 at 04:46 PM.
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    Senior Member stevelyn's Avatar

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    This is THE shit when it comes to leather reconditioning and preservation.



    leather-oil-16-2.jpg

    Restores dried leather.
    Repels water.
    Ideal for “breaking-in” new boots.
    Resists cracking and dry rot.
    Applies easily with the lambs wool applicator or clean cloth.
    Penetrates deeply into leather.
    Can be buffed to shine or polished over.
    Excellent for touch-ups between applications of Heavy Duty LP.
    Contains no harmful silicones, petroleum, solvents or paraffin.
    Restores sun-faded leather.

    http://www.obenaufs.com/Leather-Oil-...her-oil-16.htm
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