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jeepin
02-10-2012, 06:22 AM
Yugo M70AB2T Flat side (M70AB1) With real Trench Art Handguards.
Getting the inch of Cosmoline off them was a chore. Heat gun, purple power, cold water and windex.....repeat.....took hours but it was worth it to save the art!!
http://www.gunsnet.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=1267
http://www.gunsnet.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=1268
http://www.gunsnet.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=1270

videodon
02-10-2012, 07:37 AM
Gotta love that!
Welcome!
:)

Ezra Coli
02-10-2012, 10:58 AM
That's pretty cool. I love the hstory we can find on these.

I had a VZ52 with loads of trench art on it. Worth keeping.

jeepin
02-10-2012, 11:38 AM
Love the history too!!!

raxar
02-10-2012, 06:36 PM
looks like he forgot how to spell his name...

jeepin
02-10-2012, 08:04 PM
looks like he forgot how to spell his name...

LMAO....could be true!!

l921428x
02-11-2012, 12:28 AM
That is really cool. Can you buy the handguards?

jeepin
02-11-2012, 01:15 AM
I don't know....I traded my quad rail for a few sets..........

raxar
02-11-2012, 08:31 AM
That is really cool. Can you buy the handguards?

apex

https://www.apexgunparts.com/product_info.php/cPath/21_122/products_id/1419

l921428x
02-11-2012, 05:42 PM
Thanks Raxar.



Just ordered a set, we will see what happens. I might need some help from you guys.........stay tuned.
Is this war profitering?

l921428x
02-18-2012, 12:18 AM
Got 3 sets in today, now I have to clean them up and see where we are.

Jeepin did yours come with a pistol grip, if so, did you use it?

l921428x
03-14-2012, 09:32 PM
The stock is a different matter. Water and harsh chemicals are simply poor choices for cleaning wood. Chemical companies have been working for many years to develop cleaners for wood, only a few of which are water based. Murphy’s Oil Soap is one such product that can be used in reasonable quantities on wood. The heavy duty “green” and “orange” cleaners are simply not appropriate for cleaning wood stocks. They contain harsh chemicals that are absolutely not necessary for cleaning cosmoline. So if your objective is to do nothing damaging to the wood while simultaneously removing the cosmoline, do NOT use any water based cleaners and avoid “grease cutters” like oven cleaners. They are extremely harsh chemicals (like, why else are you supposed to wear gloves if they aren’t harsh?) and are NOT GOOD FOR WOOD.

So, let’s explore the correct way to remove cosmoline. As mentioned above, gentle heat is by far the best way to liquefy and remove cosmoline. If your oven is big enough you can put it in there at "warm" (lowest possible oven setting) and it will bleed the cosmo out from the pores of the wood. Be sure to preheat the oven before putting the stock in it as even on the warm setting the element gets very hot initially, hot enough to burn the wood. Wipe it down every 15 minutes with old toweling until the weeping has stopped. If that won't work due to size or domestic issues you can put it outside in a plastic bag, some people like black because it absorbs the heat of the sun better and some prefer clear because they opine that the direct sunshine generates more heat. This will take a little longer but it's important that whenever it starts to cool down that the stock be removed and wiped dry. I kind of like the creativity of the "dashboard" process which is a sheet of tinfoil bent up to hold liquefied Cosmoline and set on the dashboard of your vehicle. I haven't done it but it sounds like a great plan to me if you have a place where you can do it without tempting someone to “borrow” your stock. The latest method is a wrap in rags, VERY tightly sealed in a plastic bag, and a bath in the hottest water you can get. Haven’t tried that one but it sounds pretty reasonable to me. Word has it that you can add boiling water from your stove to the hot water from your heater and get pretty satisfactory results.

my-rifle
04-15-2012, 01:31 AM
I have repeatedly tried the "dashboard" method. It does not work in the 110 degree New Orleans heat. What has worked exceedingly well every time is the lacquer thinner method. Immerse the wood in lacquer thinner for 1 week. Remove it and let the wood dry for 1 to 2 weeks, so it can return to its original size. At this point there is *no* oil left in the wood.

Zero.

You have to replace the oil with BLO to make it look good and return it to strength, but I have handguards I treated with this process 2 years ago, and have still not re-oiled. They look beautiful and are still firm and strong. I rotated one of them onto a gas cylinder, and it went right on. The ones I did re-oil look like factory wood but with the carvings dark and intact. This is really the best method I've found after five years of trying different methods.

abpt1
04-15-2012, 01:19 PM
Yugo M70AB2T Flat side (M70AB1) With real Trench Art Handguards.
Getting the inch of Cosmoline off them was a chore. Heat gun, purple power, cold water and windex.....repeat.....took hours but it was worth it to save the art!!
http://www.gunsnet.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=1267
http://www.gunsnet.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=1268
http://www.gunsnet.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=1270

THATS NICE!
I have always wanted one with some just never found one with the right price....

l921428x
04-17-2012, 06:24 AM
If you are talking about the handgaurds I got 3 sets for 35 bucks from apex. Use the Raxar link above.